Book Review: The Boy on the Bridge by M. R. Carey.

How excited was I for this book?

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 I read Carey’s The Girl With All the Gifts last year and thought it was one of the best thrillers I’d read for a long time. I rarely read horror, especially zombie novels, but it was one of my favourite books of 2016. Needless to say, when I heard Carey was writing another book in that universe, I preordered it immediately.

(I preordered the ebook, which some people might think is a bit stupid, but I bloody love ebooks.)

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October Reads 2016.

How can it be November already?!

I had a good October overall (apart from failing yet another driving test) and because I went away to Cornwall for a week of it, I got a fair few books read. I’m especially happy though as I found some new favourites.


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1. The Stone Gods by Jeanette Winterson.

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Book Review: ‘Labyrinth: One Classic Film, Fifty-Five Sonnets’ by A Corrigan.

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This in no way affects my opinion of the book. Quotes below may differ in the final published version of the book.

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I love me a bit of Labyrinth, so when I saw this book was available for immediate download, obviously I had to give it a go.

The book follows the story of the Jim Henson film, with each ‘chapter’ in the form of a sonnet (14 lines with an ABAB rhyme scheme, including a rhyming couplet at the end). If you’ve read a lot of traditional poetry, this may be a bit unsophisticated for you, but if it’s your first foray into poetry you might find it a fun read.

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The Queen Book Tag.

Thanks so much to Zezee With Books for tagging me! Queen are my all-time favourite band and I basically think that if a song’s not by Queen then it’s probably not worth listening to. (I mean, there are exceptions, but rest assured, Queen are the best band ever.)

This tag was created by Josh at Literary Gladiators.

1. Bohemian Rhapsody – A work that you feel successfully tells the story from multiple points of view?
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The Sunne in Splendour by Sharon Penman.

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Book Review: ‘Swing Time’ by Zadie Smith.

I received this ebook for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is no way affects my opinion of the book. Quotes in the following review may differ slightly from the final published version of the book.

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I was excited to receive this book but unsure what to expect. I loved Smith’s White Teeth, but couldn’t get past the first chapter of On Beauty. I downloaded Swing Time with a butterflies in my stomach, hoping this would be something great.

It’s no White Teeth. The protagonist, whose name remains a mystery, is try-hard, selfish and unlikeable. She changes her personality depending on whom she is with, and shows little interest in anyone other than herself and her alleged friend Tracy, whom she is (often creepily) obsessed with. She’s uncaring towards her mother and behaves bafflingly towards the men in her life.

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Books from the Points of View of Animals.

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I was going to do a top 5, but had too many books battling for places so decided to just do a list of books that I’ve enjoyed that feature animals as the main characters. So, in no particular order…

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Bimbo & Topsy by Enid Blyton.

Blyton wrote hundreds of books about talking animals, and I can’t even remember this one that well, but I get a warm feeling whenever I think about it. It was about Bimbo, a naughty Siamese kitten, and Topsy, a somewhat stupid terrier who gets caught up in Bimbo’s mischief.

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Book Review: ‘Smoke’ by Dan Vyleta.

I received this ebook for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is no way affects my opinion of the book. Quotes in the following review may differ slightly from the final published version of the book.

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Have you ever wondered what it would be like if Dickens wrote YA? Me neither, but that’s essentially what you get with Smoke.

Vyleta draws us in to his dark Victorian setting with a sinister opening scene at a boys’ boarding school. Julius, our seemingly perfect prefect, takes the role of Grand Inquisitor, questioning his fellow students until their bodies begin to physically smoke.

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