Book Review: The Boy on the Bridge by M. R. Carey.

How excited was I for this book?

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 I read Carey’s The Girl With All the Gifts last year and thought it was one of the best thrillers I’d read for a long time. I rarely read horror, especially zombie novels, but it was one of my favourite books of 2016. Needless to say, when I heard Carey was writing another book in that universe, I preordered it immediately.

(I preordered the ebook, which some people might think is a bit stupid, but I bloody love ebooks.)

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Book Review: ‘The Noughtie Girl’s Guide to Feminism’ by Ellie Levenson.

Levenson’s book can be summed up in three words: simple, opinionated, choice. She discusses lots of areas in which gender discrimination is still a problem in modern society, but the be-all and end-all of her argument is this: women can do whatever they like, provided it’s their own choice.

 In that respect, I agree. No woman should be forced into doing anything or being anything against her will. If she wants to work and never get married, that’s her business and no one else’s. If she wants to stay at home and look after the kids, that’s also completely up to her. If she wants to be somewhere between the two, I’m not going to argue with her, and neither should anyone else.

However, Levenson contradicts herself. She waxes lyrical about how important it is for women to make their own choices, and how no one should judge them for it. But she slates women who wear white wedding gowns and want their boyfriends to ask their father’s permission before proposing:

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Book Review: ‘Life in a Fishbowl’ by Len Vlahos.

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This in no way affects my opinion of the book. Quotes below may differ in the final published version of the book.

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Life in a Fishbowl is the story of Jackie, a young girl who adores her father and is devastated when she hears that he has a brain tumour and only has a few months to live.

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Book Review: ‘Labyrinth: One Classic Film, Fifty-Five Sonnets’ by A Corrigan.

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This in no way affects my opinion of the book. Quotes below may differ in the final published version of the book.

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I love me a bit of Labyrinth, so when I saw this book was available for immediate download, obviously I had to give it a go.

The book follows the story of the Jim Henson film, with each ‘chapter’ in the form of a sonnet (14 lines with an ABAB rhyme scheme, including a rhyming couplet at the end). If you’ve read a lot of traditional poetry, this may be a bit unsophisticated for you, but if it’s your first foray into poetry you might find it a fun read.

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Book Review: ‘Nina is Not OK’ by Shappi Khorsandi.

I received this ebook for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is no way affects my opinion of the book. Quotes in the following review may differ slightly from the final published version of the book.

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‘Dear sir or madam,

I’m writing to complain about my treatment by your staff on Saturday night.

At approximately 11.20pm, I gave a young man I’d just met a blowjob by the downstairs bar. One of your bouncers (I’m afraid I cannot describe him, my vision was blurred) dragged me out and threw me onto the street without giving me a chance to call my mum, tell my friends or finish the blowjob.

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Book Review: ‘No Virgin’ by Anne Cassidy.

I received this ebook for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is no way affects my opinion of the book. Quotes in the following review may differ slightly from the final published version of the book.

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The beginning of this book was very slow and to be honest quite badly written. The main character was an embarrassment: she is socially awkward and overly hurt by friend situations that aren’t really situations at all. Early on in the book, she turns against Patrice, her so-called best friend – who is an extremely good, attentive friend to main character Stacey – because Patrice invites someone from one of her classes over her house without clearing it with Stacey beforehand.

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Book Review: ‘Swing Time’ by Zadie Smith.

I received this ebook for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is no way affects my opinion of the book. Quotes in the following review may differ slightly from the final published version of the book.

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I was excited to receive this book but unsure what to expect. I loved Smith’s White Teeth, but couldn’t get past the first chapter of On Beauty. I downloaded Swing Time with a butterflies in my stomach, hoping this would be something great.

It’s no White Teeth. The protagonist, whose name remains a mystery, is try-hard, selfish and unlikeable. She changes her personality depending on whom she is with, and shows little interest in anyone other than herself and her alleged friend Tracy, whom she is (often creepily) obsessed with. She’s uncaring towards her mother and behaves bafflingly towards the men in her life.

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