7 Times the Harry Potter Books Were Problematic.

In a diverse, forward-thinking age, the wonderfully woke generation of so-called millennials are starting to look more closely at the entertainment of the past. Look at the backlash of Friends‘ arrival on Netflix earlier this year. We still love it, but we can no longer ignore the lack of multicultural characters, the ‘token’ lesbian couple or Joey’s constant creepiness. We notice things more, and we won’t stand for the things we’re noticing.

I think it’s great that we’re taking issue with shows like Friends. It shows how much more accepting we are just 20 years later. The world is a scary, discriminatory place, but I genuinely believe my generation is the most tolerant yet and I have high hopes for what it can achieve.

It’s OK to like problematic things. Friends still makes me laugh and cry. We just need to be aware of what’s wrong with it too. With that in mind, I turned my attention to the Harry Potter series.

J. K. Rowling has had some controversial opinions lately, but whatever I think of her keyboard-warrier habit, I do think that the Harry Potter books are not, as a rule, very problematic. However, there are some messed-up moments that I have picked up on as I grow more observant of these attitudes. Here are 7 problematic moments in the Harry Potter franchise.

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Book Review: Lily and the Octopus by Steven Rowley

This is an odd one to try to explain to people.

 Lily and the Octopus is about Ted, who talks to his dachshund, Lily, and thinks he can hear her talking back. It’s unclear whether he genuinely believes she is talking to him, or if it’s just how he copes. At the beginning of the book, Ted notices a tumour on Lily’s head, although he doesn’t name it, instead seeing it as an octopus, which shortly also begins talking to him.

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Theatre Review: Young Frankenstein

It seems all movies make their way to the stage in the end. Young Frankenstein is a welcome addition, as would be much of Mel Brooks’ catalogue, familiar as his films are with raucous laughter and ridiculous songs.

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 This musical parody follows the story of Frederick Frankenstein, sceptical descendent of Mary Shelley’s Victor, who visits Transylvania to settle his late grandfather’s estate. While there, he picks up where his grandfather left off to create his very own Creature.

It’s almost too faithful to the original film, not adding much of its own flair. However it works as a stage show and the nostalgia wins out in the end, to the point where the audience are laughing seconds before the best lines. There are moments from the film that really needed changing: a rape that becomes consensual is a backwards idea that could have been updated, instead of copying the film outright.

It is a star-studded cast, and of course Ross Noble’s Igor won the audience’s hearts the moment he stepped – or should we say, skulked – onstage. He added his own flair to the most famous lines (giving the audience some extra giggles during the “walk this way” moment) and, although the role will always belong to Marty Feldman, he is a worthy actor to play the part – though his cockney accent is a little overkill.

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January Reads 2018.

It’s been a good start to 2018 (in reading terms, anyway). I found a brand-new favourite novel in January, and am really enjoying my general attitude towards reading at the moment. Gone are the days of reading a book just so I can write a review/tick it off my TBR/add it to my Goodreads challenge! Now I only read books I really want to read, and I feel so much better for it.

I’ve also tried to be better with my blogging this year, and have scheduled every Monday at 7pm for a weekly post. I did miss last week – oops! I would’ve just posted later in the week but sadly my Macbook doesn’t want to turn on at the moment. Fingers crossed it’s just the battery!


The Power by Naomi Alderman

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This won the 2017 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction so has been on my radar since then. I didn’t read any of the shortlist but from the synopsis this was the one that sparked my interest the most, so I was quite surprised when it won (as my idea of an award-winner is often quite different to that of literary judges). I love the premise behind it: a switcheroo of male and female roles in society, women suddenly finding themselves in the seats of power when they develop the ability to electrocute from their fingertips.

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