A Bookish De-Clutter.

Getting rid of books may sound like sacrilege to some of you, but I would very much recommend it. As beautiful as books are, they take up a lot of space and I don’t know about you, but I often buy books that I’m really excited about at the time but when I get it home I’m just… never in the mood to read it. And if I haven’t been in the mood to read a book for 6 months, it’s got to go.

Here’s a few books I’m getting rid of and why.


The Stolen White Elephant by Mark Twain, The Night is Darkening Round Us by Emily Dickinson, Circles of Hell by Dante, Wailing Ghosts by Pu Songling.

I bought these Penguin Little Black Books in my ‘I’m going to have a beautiful book collection’ phase, before I realised how much I dislike clutter. These were purely shallow purchases, bought for their good looks, and I’m not interested in what lies beneath the surface.

Three Wishes by Liane Moriarty.

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My Stephen King TBR List.

I’ve read a few King books in my time, and have always found him to be somewhat hit-and-miss. The books I do enjoy, I really really enjoy, but the books I don’t enjoy, I can’t even finish. For some reason it’s all his biggest bestsellers that I don’t like – The Shining, It, Carrie (I did finish that one – it’s pretty short – but can’t see what all the fuss is about) and all his lesser-known ones that I love: MiseryThe Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon; and Thinner, to name a few.

Because of this, there are severa King books that I’m just not interested in reading. However, he has given me hours of reading pleasure and there are several that still really intrigue me. I’m always wary of starting a King book just in case it takes me a while to get into it, so some of this have been on my TBR for years.


dark half.jpeg1. The Dark Half

This is about an author and his – alter-ego? Twin? I’m not sure, but I think it’s a pseudonym he writes under which comes to life, or maybe it’s all in his head à la Secret Window.

(Actually, Secret Window‘s plotline sounds so similar to The Dark Half that for a long time I thought they’d just changed the name.)

This less traditional horror story is the sort I really enjoy from King, so I’d like to give the book a go.

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August (and July!) 2017 Reads.

Huh! I didn’t do a July wrap-up because I thought I hadn’t read any books that month, but I’ve just looked at Goodreads and noticed this one:

one of us is lying

One of Us Is Lying by Karen McManus.

It feels absolutely ages since I read this book now, but I remember I did really enjoy it. I felt it focused too much on the love story in the end, but it was definitely a book where I really wanted to know what would happen next and wanted to keep reading. If you’re looking for a quick, light read, and you like YA, this is a good one to choose.

It has an interesting premise: basically the movie The Breakfast Club goes horribly wrong. Five high school students, all belonging to certain cliques, are in detention together when one of them, Simon, suffers an allergic reaction and dies. The police treat the death as suspicious and it transpires that each of the students in detention that day had a possible motive for killing Simon.


And here are the books I read in August:

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My Bookish Wishlist.

I’ve been neglecting my book blog lately, haven’t I? I’ve been excited about fashion and have had lots of ideas for that blog, and although I have been reading, I’ve not had much to talk about in the way of books. I’m thinking of combining my book blog and my fashion blog on a new site. I still think WordPress is great but its limitations are starting to show – I feel like it’s hard to make your blog look unique on this platform. What do you think?

Anyway, here’s my bookish wishlist. I could go on all day and talk about my dream library but these are the books I’m actually planning on buying, and which won’t need their own room.


Beloved Authors

Origin by Dan Brown.

Robert Langdon returns this October in Origin, to solve more mysteries and break more codes. A lot of people think the Langdon books are silly and low-rent (read my D is for… The Da Vinci Code post to see why I disagree) but I was so excited when I heard we were getting a new book. These books are the definition of page-turners and I’m sure Origin won’t disappoint.

The Last Tudor by Philippa Gregory.

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Top 5 Wednesday: Children’s Books for Grown-Ups.

Top 5 Wednesday is a weekly meme (on Wednesdays, duh) hosted by Thoughts on Tomes on Youtube. I don’t participate every Wednesday but I like to hop in whenever it’s a theme that speaks to me. This week’s theme/subject is top 5 children’s books, and oh my god, I LOVE me some children’s books.

As I’ve written a post previously about my favourite books from when I was a kid, as well as a ‘My Life in Books‘ post about the books that I feel were important in making me the person I am today, I’m going to switch this one up a bit. Today I’m going to talk about what I consider to be the 5 best children’s books (or book series) that I discovered as an adult.

It’s a great thing for people keep reading children’s books when they’re older. It takes us back to a time when we could stay up all night to finish a book without worrying about having to get up the next day, and when we were secretly convinced that the things we read about were true and written by some emissary from a faraway land. I’ve discovered some fabulous children’s stories despite these stories allegedly being ‘for kids’.

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June Reads 2017.

Sorry, how is it 2nd July? Did we not just celebrate New Year? Have we skipped forward in time?

I didn’t read as much as usual this month but the most amazing thing that’s come out of June is a newfound interest in writing. My friend has been writing her novel for a while now and she told me she just started by playing with characters and a story grew out of it. She inspired me to change up the way I approach writing, and by just making sure I write a little each day, even if it’s just a sentence, I’m beginning to create something I really like.


The first book I read in June was The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. I’ve been really getting into the TV series which is currently being shown on Channel 4, so I decided to give the book another go. This time, I really enjoyed it, though I did find it petered out towards the end. The world-building was probably my favourite thing about this novel. I love a good dystopian.

handmaid

The ending was a bit more optimistic than I expected, and I have to admit I always feel this about dystopians – they’re so much more interesting when the characters are living under the regime, rather than when they’re fighting against it. This is why I always enjoy the first book in a dystopian series the most (as well as the fact that the first book in a series is usually the best anyway).

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